CRA COMMENTS ON FINDINGS IN RECENT REPORT ON SUGARS AND HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

American Heart Association study leads to confusion

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 24, 2009

CONTACT: Audrae Erickson
(202) 331-1634

WASHINGTON, DC – Following a statement concerning “high-sugar” diets and increased blood pressure in men released yesterday by the American Heart Association, several media reports have unfortunately confused pure fructose with high fructose corn syrup, erroneously suggesting that they are equivalent ingredients consumed by Americans.

“It is important not to treat studies involving massive levels of pure fructose as if they reflect what Americans eat,” noted Audrae Erickson, president of the Corn Refiners Association. “Consumers should know that fructose is commonly found in many fruits, vegetables and juices, as well as in many sweeteners, including table sugar, honey, and high fructose corn syrup, which all contain roughly equal portions of fructose and glucose.”

“A laboratory diet consisting of extreme amounts of pure fructose is not how sweeteners are consumed by real people, most of whom understand the value of moderation in what they eat” continued Erickson. “As many dietitians agree, all sugars should be consumed in moderation as part of a balanced lifestyle.”

Sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and several fruit juices are all roughly equal in both fructose and glucose content and are nutritionally the same. High fructose corn syrup is simply a kind of corn sugar.

The American Medical Association has stated that, “Because the composition of high fructose corn syrup and sucrose are so similar, particularly on absorption by the body, it appears unlikely that high fructose corn syrup contributes more to obesity or other conditions than sucrose.” (Report 3 of the Council on Science and Public Health A-08, June 2008.)

According to the American Dietetic Association (ADA), “high fructose corn syrup…is nutritionally equivalent to sucrose. Once absorbed into the blood stream, the two sweeteners are indistinguishable.” The ADA also noted that “Both sweeteners contain the same number of calories (4 per gram) and consist of about equal parts of fructose and glucose.” (Hot Topics, “High Fructose Corn Syrup.” December 2008.)

More information is available at www.SweetSurprise.com.

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The Corn Refiners Association (CRA) is the national trade association representing the corn refining (wet milling) industry of the United States. CRA and its predecessors have served this important segment of American agribusiness since 1913. Corn refiners manufacture sweeteners, ethanol, starch, bioproducts, corn oil, and feed products from corn components such as starch, oil, protein, and fiber.