Recent News Reports of Sweetener Reformulations Raise Questions about Motivations

Read what other experts are saying about sweetener switching.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 30, 2009

CONTACT: Audrae Erickson
(202) 331-1634

WASHINGTON, DC – The misleading “health” halo surrounding highly-publicized marketing campaigns regarding sweetener reformulations is starting to dim.

Recent announcements by Starbucks and other brands that they will remove high fructose corn syrup from certain products are being called into question in news articles by several experts and respected journalists. These articles have poked holes in companies’ marketing efforts and put forth scientifically substantiated facts about sweeteners commonly used in foods.

“Consumers are being misled into thinking that there are nutritional differences between high fructose corn syrup and sugar, when in fact they are nutritionally the same,” said Audrae Erickson, president of the Corn Refiners Association. “Whether from cane, beets, or corn, a sugar is a sugar. They all contain four calories per gram. Switching out a kind of corn sugar for table sugar is not for health and it is not for science. It is for quarterly earnings. It is unfortunate that consumers are being duped by these marketing gimmicks – gimmicks which may result in higher food prices at checkout,” Erickson said.

To learn more about the latest research and facts about sweeteners, including high fructose corn syrup, please visit www.SweetSurprise.com.

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CRA is the national trade association representing the corn refining (wet milling) industry of the United States. CRA and its predecessors have served this important segment of American agribusiness since 1913. Corn refiners manufacture sweeteners, ethanol, starch, bioproducts, corn oil, and feed products from corn components such as starch, oil, protein, and fiber.


1. Huget JL. June 12, 2009. “Is That Right? “Real Sugar” is Everywhere. But is it Better for You?” Washingtonpost.com/The Checkup. Accessed June 28, 2009. http://voices.washingtonpost.com/checkup/2009/06/is_that_right_real_sugar_is_ev.html

2. Mills S. June 25, 2009. “Natural sugar versus high-fructose corn syrup.” The Chicago Tribune. Available online http://www.chicagotribune.com/health/chi-high-fructose-corn-syrup-25-jun25,0,7627724.story

3. Nestle M. “HFCS-free sales booming.” foodpolitics.com. Accessed June 29, 2009. http://www.foodpolitics.com/2009/06/hfcs-free-sales-booming/